Sunday, November 24, 2013

In The Morning I'll Be Gone - The First Review

The first review of In The Morning I'll Be Gone came in last week. It's from Jon Page of Bite The Book and here it is (below). Remember Jon only reviewed the galley so the actual book is bound to be funnier, crisper and all together even more brilliant. The heart of In The Morning is pretty much an old school locked room mystery, a subgenre of mystery writing that I've always loved and always wanted to try. Anyway here's what Mr Page had to say:
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Every great trilogy knocks you out with the first one, takes it up a notch with the second one and then blows you away with the final chapter. There a few great trilogies. Many fail at the second hurdle let alone the final one. But not Adrian McKinty. The Sean Duffy books are a truly great trilogy and destined to become a classic of the crime genre and the third and the final volume is the best yet.

Things were not looking good for our hero at the end of I Hear The Sirens In The Street. Sean Duffy had been demoted out of CID and dispatched to the border lands. His career in the police force appeared to be over. That is until a mass breakout occurs from the infamous Maze Prison in September, 1983. One of the IRA’s most dangerous men, Dermot McCann, is on the loose and planning a campaign of terror against Britain. MI5 are prepared to do anything to bring him in, including giving Sean his old job back.

Sean has a connection to Dermot but no one is giving anybody up in Northern Ireland. Sean’s digging instead leads him to an unsolved murder. A locked room mystery that has got everybody stumped. But the key to unearthing Dermot’s whereabouts maybe be found in figuring out this seemingly unsolvable mystery.

As with the previous two books McKinty skillfully blends humour and the grim realities of living in war torn Belfast in 1984 with a gripping, realistic mystery. Sean Duffy is perfectly flawed and damaged but determined to do the right thing, even if that means doing a couple of wrong things. It is a tragedy that this series must come to an end because what McKinty has been able to produce has been very special and he has taken his writing to a new level. There’s a fine line between social commentary and compelling mystery and not many writers, crime or literary, can do both. McKinty has not only been able to pull it off brilliantly but he has done so over three amazing books.


I’m going to miss Sean Duffy but I also can’t wait to see where Adrian McKinty goes next.

51 comments:

speedskater42k said...

Looking forward to it!

Alan said...

Adrian,Congratulations on the "brilliant"review. Is there a chance for a review in the Guardian or other British/Irish papers or magazines? I hope that the possible end of the Duffy trilogy gives birth to another protagonist who embodies the complexites of Scots-Irish delimma. I know your readership wishes you much success both psychological and pecuniary that should accrue to a disciplined and creative scholar and author.Best Alan

lil Gluckstern said...

What a great review, and how to whet my appetite! Sounds really good to me. I like your protagonists so much. Will you be birthing a new one or revisiting ahold one? Either way, I'll look forward to it!

adrian mckinty said...

Speedskater

Cheers mate.

adrian mckinty said...

Alan

There will definitely be reviews in the British, Irish and Australian newspapers. But as for America? Well I just dont know how to break that market and I've pretty much given up trying.

adrian mckinty said...

Lil

Not entirely sure. I suppose the options are 1) Duffy4 2) new standalone 3) new series 4) revisit an old character. Definitely one of those but which...

seana graham said...

Maybe a musical?

The Duffiad, however long it proves to be, definitely goes from strength to strength. Though with Tom Waits as your muse, how could you really have gone wrong?

adrian mckinty said...

Seana

I'd love to do a musical. If only I could sing or play an instrument or read music or carry a tune...

seana graham said...

I see Duffy as more of a tap dancer, which really only requires rhythm.

Also, we have evidence that you can play the guitar.

Lester Carthan said...

I went to Amazon.com and Amazon.uk and if you are willing to import the novel you can get it at the end of January rather than beginning of March. Not that I’m complaining there have been instances in the past where a book just won’t get published stateside even if the book is part of a series with an obvious fan following which can get a bit pricy.

Martin said...

ohhh wie gerne würde ich das buch auf dem Foto in der hand halten. freu mich schon darauf.

Brendan O'Leary said...

Adrian, congratulations on a great review but after reading the first two and then all your other books while I was waiting, I absolutely trust that you would pull it off and the brilliance of the book will be no surprise to me.

May the world catch up with you soon.

John McFetridge said...

My good friend Linwood Barclay also complains about not being able to crack the American market (okay, we're not close, but I have met him a few times ;)). No one knows how to do it.

I would love to see another Duffy trilogoy - maybe he moves to New York.....

seana graham said...

That is, if he doesn't die. If he survives the locked room puzzle, and hasn't gone completely insane trying to solve it, maybe he moves to Australia. I've heard that there's a nice little community just outside of Melbourne where he could recuperate.

Lester Carthan said...

@John McFetridge

If there is a next novel I predict that Australia will be the next location. My theory is that all of Adrian's novels take place in locations that he's lived in, at the time he lived there, and we haven't seen Australia yet. The exception would be Cuba in 50 Grand but given his recently revealed list of literary geography readers should make a pilgrimage too I would argue that he’s lived there in his heart if not in person so that counts too.

As for breaking into the American Market there is an easy path to do so. Plenty of niche writers have become rich and famous by doing their best imitation of Lee Child, Dan Brown, etc and after book three or so sales of their imitation work will skyrocket even though their early original work was far superior.

I know I sound jaded right now about the state of the publishing industry but it’s obvious certain writers are using ghost writers and each novel is a best seller regardless of who wrote it because of the name on the cover. Yes I have no proof but c’mon you have writers who spent years writing one big novel every two years, releasing three or four big novels every year that just isn’t possible unless they have help.

swooperman said...

Good review mate, nice one

Steve said...

Great review! Can't wait to hear it! Congrats

adrian mckinty said...

Seana

Well "play the guitar" is a relative term isnt it?

adrian mckinty said...

Lester

Yeah I always find the international shipping isnt that expensive especially if you consolidate and get a couple of books at the same time.

adrian mckinty said...

Martin

Well, there will be a German version eventually and Duffy#2 will be out in Germany in 2014 if Amazon.de is to be believed.

adrian mckinty said...

Brendan

Jesus, I certainly hope so..

adrian mckinty said...

John

Yeah I know. I suppose option 5) is to fucking quit the business completely, stop writing and get a high paying job in Western Australia working down a mine.

adrian mckinty said...

Seana

I suppose if I was a marketing genius I would have mentioned that Michael Forsythe makes an appearance in Duff#3 in the blogpost not this comment thread. Oh well...

adrian mckinty said...

Lester

If I could write a Dan Brown knock off under a pseudonym I'd do it, but I just cant! I reckon that level of bullshit is harder than it looks.

adrian mckinty said...

Swoop

Thanks mate

adrian mckinty said...

Steve

Cheers buddy.

seana graham said...

I'm sure you'll have another shot at it.

Michael Forsythe makes a terrific appearance in this book, folks. It is not, however, what Adrian first termed it here when he had just written it, 'cute'. Or maybe it was 'sweet'? Anyway, it's neither, and for that we should be grateful.

I'm still mad at Colin Farrell for not playing him when he had the chance.

Brendan O'Leary said...

"get a high paying job in Western Australia working down a mine"
Pretty much where I started many years ago, followed by a life on drilling rigs. However I was single without kids back then, and by the time I was married with kids, it was a way of life.

I'm doing my best to extend your fame by the painfully slow "word of mouth" method so you may be spared my fate.


Still, the rig workers Moby Dick is yet to be written...


By the way, the first mining camp I worked in had complete George Orwell including essays in the bookshop, along with "Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man" and "On the Road"

Brendan O'Leary said...

Lester, Adrian has a short story -the standout one in my opinion - in an Australian crime collection featuring an Australian character.

Collection's called "Crime Factory: Hard Labour" - perhaps it's only on kindle. And probably doesn't make him even beer money but it's worth seeking out. Also stories by seasoned pros Peter Corris and Garry Disher as well as up-and-comers.

adrian mckinty said...

Seana

You and me both. I think he made Miami Vice instead...

adrian mckinty said...

Brendan

They were supposed to pay me 25 dollars for that story and I dont think they ever did. Nice bunch of lads though over at Crime Factory. If its the story I'm thinking of too its called The Dutch Book and is a classic arbitrage situation which happens in a casino when the bookmaker gets the odds wrong...

Alan said...

Adrian, I searched the American Amazon Kindle for The Crime Factory "Hard Labor" ...no joy.It could be in that "locked room" for which I will wait and pounce on the U.K.edition.Best Alan

Brendan O'Leary said...

Well that might have got you two beers in Melbourne.

Alan, it shows up on Amazon.com for me as well as Amazon.co.uk. I'll see if I can post a link.

Try this:http://www.amazon.com/Crime-Factory-Labour-David-Whish-Wilson-ebook/dp/B009NOW6ZQ

Alan said...

Brendan, Thank you.Best Alan

adrian mckinty said...

Brendan, Alan

Yes its definitely still available. The Crime Factory guys have 3 books out now and I've contributed to all of them. My favourite one is probably the Lee Marvin tribute they put out.

T Tompkins said...

Adrian,
I have followed links from your Wikipedia site to Ken Bruen, Declan Hughes, and Stuart Neville and found great work. I'm wondering if you could post some sort of year-end thing that'll clue readers into who you're currently reading, etc. I don't mind paying for lousy books, but I do mind wasting the time to get 100 pages into a book before giving up hope (as I did recently with a David Whellams book). It would be a valuable community service.

adrian mckinty said...

T

If you scroll down a few posts to early November you'll find a complete list of the books I've read this year complete with ratings...

Sheiler said...

Congrats on the review!

Ugh I hate to admit it but I was *this* close to getting a paid gig as one of 4 ghost writers for some sci fi novel. Maybe the guy was just someone with money and no publishing credibility but he wanted to pay me to write and he liked my samples. But then this huge contract comes along, as one does, and he's got the others agreeing to pay him for every day that the chapters are late. It was then that I knew I had a line I would not cross.

I had other tweaks while the back and forth thing was going on. Things like "I could be writing what I want to write with the time this other thing will take." But it was the money, badly needed too, that got me to where I am today. Taking up space on your blog, Adrian. Feh.

adrian mckinty said...

Sheiler

The worst thing about ghost writing IMHO is the lack of royalties. Co Authors get royalties (of celebrity biographies etc) ghost writing generally dont. I always feel a bit angry and ripped off after a ghost writing job, and unless I'm really hard up for cash here at chez McKinty I'm really reluctant to ever do it again.

Lester Carthan said...

As a reader my biggest problem with the ghost writing industry is that there is a large body of work by writers I love forever denied to me which is very infuriating. An example of this would be David Gordon who has written two novels I really love and a lot more that I know are out there but are forever beyond reach and that makes mad and sad. And yes I know how selfish I’m being because my concern should be for the ghost writer not getting the money and attention due rather than my needs as a reader.

Lester Carthan said...

I just read Adrian last post and am blown away by the revaluation that he has ghost written work out there. Adrian work is, at least in my area, widely distributed in libraries and the town’s remaining book store. Being a published writer has to be a lot scarier than I thought if a writer who has by every metric possible made it and yet is forced to ghost write to get by.

adrian mckinty said...

Lester

I havent had to ghost for a couple of years now, but I've done it in the past. Iron clad and scary confidentiality agreements dont permit me to elaborate on who that was for.

Like I say, its not to be recommended. Co authoring is fine but ghosting is a nasty business.
Writers dont have a union unlike screenwriters. When a screenwriter's "doctoring" or "punch up" job generates more than a certain % of the final script as I understand it the screenwriter MUST be offered credit by union rules. But as I ghost I could write 99% of someone else's book and no one would ever know about it.

seana graham said...

A friend of mine has done at least one ghosting assignment, and seemed to find it more interesting than anything else, but as a former newspaper reporter, she was coming at it from a different angle. I haven't talked to her about it since she finished that project. She may feel differently now. She recommended Jennie Erdal's book Ghosting: A Double Life, which I started and got off track from somehow. Her situation sounds a bit crazier than some, though.

It would be hard as a writer if your ghostwritten book was a huge success while your own efforts remained ignored.

adrian mckinty said...

Seana

"It would be hard as a writer if your ghostwritten book was a huge success while your own efforts remained ignored."

Well thats the nature of the business and I dont mind that, but I do mind getting ripped off on the money. A flat fee is a complete con. A book could sell a million copies and you're stuck with the meagre flat fee you signed on for when you were desperate? What a bloody rip off.


seana graham said...

I did the trivia book for a flat fee, and though I don't feel particularly bitter about it, I doubt that I would do that again. Luckily, I don't think they have made millions on it. But actually, I have no idea.

Brendan O'Leary said...

Does the confidentiality agreement allow you to list it on your CV? At least if it was a big seller that could give you some negotiating clout.

Sheiler said...

Definitely the lack of royalties bothered me. But the whole agreeing to PAY the AUTHOR for any late work. For MY WORK. I couldn't believe the nerve.

I have a pair of Noam Chomsky trousers that he signed that I am allowed to auction off. I found out from a friend who's got a livelihood going with his ebay auctions that I need to pay some service to authenticate the trousers before trying to sell them off.

My urges to curse the world have not yet abated.

adrian mckinty said...

Seana

Thats the thing with publishers though - they NEVER give you accurate info.

adrian mckinty said...

Brendan

I suppose I could put it on my CV but then if they ask me to elaborate I wouldnt be able to. Its a pretty awful business really.

adrian mckinty said...

Sheiler

I'd hang onto to those trousers. Noam, bless him, isnt long for this world and their value will increase I reckon.

Sheiler said...

Yep you're right. But I also have his kitchen table.